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Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

img 2861 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

June! June! It can’t be be June already but the garden is proving me wrong, with so many of the June plants showing me it’s June, with the roses really starting to get going and their fragrance is starting to fill my garden. But what a week it has been, very hot and sunny and then it rained and boy did it rain! My glass left on the patio table, had 65mm in it after just being outside for 12hrs. This time last week I was heading up to Chelsea for the flower show and I had a great time there, so many stunning plants and gardens too see and inspire from. Not had to do much in the garden this week, it’s all just ticking by nicely, I do have some plants to add to the garden and now the soil is a little moist and I hopefully will get them in, I also need to plan and plant up my front door pots, just can’t decide what to put in there this summer, seen one plant I like to use and slowly adding a list together. One thing that has been decided is the removal of the forsythia in the front garden, that’s going by by this weekend!

Right enough waffling, I need my cuppa and weekend toast and the little one is of the same opinion! Again this weeks 6 is going to be a rose feast with a few others added but my roses are going away nicely now and need to be shown off!

img 2861 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

First one is a rose I planted last year and is just so beautiful to look at and the scent is stunning. Champion of the world is a Hybrid perpetual rose and that will repeat flower all summer long, it’s been around since 1894

img 2862 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

Let’s have a poppy now, never sowed them, they just appeared in extension of the flower bed when I did it last year. Poppy seeds last for years and years in the soil, just waiting to be exposed and when it does, boom there they are!

img 2863 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

Rosa iceberg is one of the most popular hybrid teas grown, this is one of the only plants now left in the front garden I haven’t added too

img 2848 1 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

Now this little sod has been in my first alpine container for the past 3 years, just sat there doing nothing and now it’s decided to flower and how lovely they are indeed, if you want to grow it and wait for 3years, it’s called Bergeranthus glenensis

img 0771 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

Rosa little Gem is a beautiful moss rose, bred in 1840, flowers Just once but the scent and flowers are amazing and it works well in shade as well as full sun

img 0772 Six on Saturday 2nd of June 2018

Now this is one of my favourite roses, flowers on and off all summer with these scented flowers, pretty disease free and tough as old boots. It is a rose that should be and deserves to be grown wider, such a great garden plant, it’s name is Amanade paternotte!

Well that’s my six for this week, I hope you enjoyed them and have a great weekend gardening, I know I will 😀 and enjoy the other six on Saturday over at the hosts site https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com

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Plant of the week- Stachyurus praecox

stachyurus praecox 4 Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecox

stachyurus praecox 3 Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecoxAt this time of year, there’s lots happening in the plant world and it’s so difficult to choose one plant of the week, then one plant just jumps out at you and screams add me add me so you do! Stachyurus praecox is indeed one of those plants. The shear beauty of the flowers will take your breathe away and rightly so!

stachyurus praecox Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecoxStachyurus praecox is indeed a native of Japan and into the Himalayas and was discovered in Japan by the great German explorer and physician Philippine Von Siebold. He discovered and introduced many of our Japanese plants that we grow in our gardens. Stachyurus praecox in its native Japan, can be found growing around the forest edges in the warmer temperate areas of Japan and is indeed know as a pioneer shrub, meaning it is one of the first plants to grow in a newly cleared areas.

stachyurus praecox 6 Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecoxThe name comes from Greek words Stachys meaning an ear of corn and oura meaning a tail, praecox means early for the early flowering. And it does flower early, in a normal year, it flowers from February to April, but this year it has only just started flowering in the past few weeks. The tiny flowers are borne on large racemes measuring up to 5″ long on some plants and in Japan, they are pollinated by bees. The shrub itself can grow up to 3m in height over 5 years or so. The mid green coloured leaves, turn in the autumn to a blaze of oranges and yellows and it is well worth growing for the autumn colour as well.

stachyurus praecox 4 Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecoxStachyurus praecox makes a great garden plant. It prefers a semi shaded or sunny spot in the garden with the soil being on the neutral to acidic side. Stachyurus praecox prefers a well drained soil but will be happy in a sandy loam and again despite what the books and internet says, it will grow away quite happy in a clay soil. As it comes from the warmer areas of Japan, it will tolerate temperatures as low as -15c but ideally to do its best for you, it does need a sheltered spot in the garden or indeed makes an unusual wall shrub.

Stachyurus praecox is also generally pest and disease free and requires a little pruning. To get the best flowers from the shrub, some feel it’s best to remove the older wood, say anything over 4yrs old. This keeps the Plants young and healthy and the flowering wood at its best. Of course you can also leave it alone, just removing the crossing stems and dead wood. It’s also pretty easy to propagate. Stachyurus praecox comes easily from seed, laying the plant and also by semi-ripe cuttings taken in late summer

Stachyurus praecox can be found in most of the bigger botanical gardens like Kew, Wisley and Sir Harold Hillier Gardens and can be brought from good Nurseries like Burncoose of Southdown and the welsh plant chocolate shop Crûg Farm

20180226 202933 Plant of the week  Stachyurus praecox
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Plant of the week- Echinacea purpurea ‘Virgin’

echinacea purpurea virgin 3 Plant of the week  Echinacea purpurea Virgin

echinacea purpurea virgin Plant of the week  Echinacea purpurea Virgin
Sometimes, with some groups of plants, it’s so difficult to pick out one outstanding plant from so many that are indeed all outstanding, both in colour, growth and all they bring to the party within our borders. That’s certainly the case this month with the Echinaceas. The range of colours from the original purple tones to bright pink and orange, down to the pastels of mellow yellows and whites and of course their differing heights as well of mix areas of use, from the traditional borders, pots and right to the fashionable prairie style plantings. It’s the prairie style planting that really has brought these plants to the forefront, where 100’s of forms are now being bred. As per any big breeding, plants come and go but some are real stayers and this I think is one of those.

echinacea purpurea virgin 2 Plant of the week  Echinacea purpurea Virgin
Echinacea purpurea ‘Virgin’ is a beautiful form of the purple coneflower, coneflowers are members of the daisy family that live in the prairies and open wooded areas of eastern and central North America. The name ‘Echinacea’ comes from the Greek word ekhinos, meaning hedgehog, the centre of these plants, do look like a little hedgehog with its spines poking out.

They flower from mid summer until the first frosts really and are easy to look after, just a bit of spent bloom removal and keep the slugs and snails at bay when they first start coming up in the spring. They are pretty happy in most soils as long as it doesn’t get too water logged during the winter months as sometimes they will rot off if they get too damp. This beautiful form was selected by one of the greatest plantsman and one of the main driving forces in the new perennial movement, that is still so popular, with its prairie style planting, Piet Oudolf. This delightful white form grows to 45cm tall and does have a slight fragrance. Like all echinacea, it is loved by all the pollinating insects, like bees and butterflies.

echinacea purpurea virgin 3 Plant of the week  Echinacea purpurea Virgin
It’s well worth going to RHS Wisley, as they are growing Echinacea in their trials area and they do include this one. It is also for sale on Claire Austins website if you fancy adding one to your garden! https://www.claireaustin-hardyplants.co.uk/products/echinacea-virgin

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My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17

img 0334 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17

Well it’s Saturday and time for the great meme, 6 on Saturday! The last couple of weeks of rain (many thanks to the kids breaking up, we needed this rain!) the gardens have changed from dust beds back into our lush normal English gardens. It’s made it easy to get my 6 on Saturday this week! 

img 0333 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ I love echinacea, some forms are a little busy for me, but Magnus is prefect for my garden, love the large mixed colour flowers and that the bees really love this plant too
img 0334 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Gaura lindheimeri ‘Passionate Blush’ oh I love Gauras and have a couple in my garden, I do love this form, bred by Steve Eggleton, New Zealand. I just love the purple tinged foliage and then the flowers that appear in May and disappear once it’s frosted, this form is a little more compact than most forms and is prefect in my narrow front borders
img 0338 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Agastache ‘Blackadder’ oh I love my giant Hyssop, it’s dark flowers makes a great foil to other plants as well as giving me a little height in the borders, the bees and butterflies also love it as much as I do! The foliage is also delightfully scented
img 0335 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Geranium wlassovianum ‘Lakwijk Star’ another new plant for me, I love wlassovianum anyway, I find it such a great performer in gardens, the foliage is so attractive appearing in the spring, followed by a summer of flowers ended with a great display of autumn colour on the foliage, can’t wait to see this plant mature
img 0337 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Pennisetum glaucum ‘Purple Majesty’ or purple millet, was one plant I have seen used so well in summer pot displays and always wanted to try it at home, managed to get hold of a plant this year and really loving the effect it is having near my front door, it’s giving me the height and stunning colour I wanted!
img 0336 My 6 on Saturday 12/7/17
Salvia ‘Love and Wishes’ again another group of plants I love, (tbh there’s not many I don’t like!) love and wishes is a plant I saw being used to great effect at Sir Harold Hillier gardens last summer and saw it in the garden centre a moth ago and brought it, just starting to flower now and can’t wait to see it covered in flowers

I hope you enjoyed my 6 on Saturday! If you did please checkout other people’s 6 on the memes founder website https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/ I love seeing other people’s plants and what’s happening in their gardens. Why not give it ago yourself next week and give me a shout so I can take a look

Thank you for reading mine and I hope to see you next week 

Thomas 

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Plant of the week- Centaurea macrocephala

img 1765 Plant of the week  Centaurea macrocephala

img 1765 Plant of the week  Centaurea macrocephalaThis is my second plant of the week looking at plants that attract butterflies into the garden and this week it’s time for knapweed but not any old knapweed, this is the giant knapweed or Aremanian basket flower as it’s sometimes called. Knapweed are a great plant to use to attract butterflies into the garden and range from our own native Centaurea nigra, a plant that’s well loved by all insects to this giant form, that’s not often seen in our gardens. The seed heads are also favourited by birds like goldfinches in the winter, who love the seeds
centaurea macrocephala 2 Plant of the week  Centaurea macrocephala
It’s a native of Caucasus region of Europe where tends to grow on the subalpine meadows at around 2000-2300m above sea level. It was introduced into the uk about 200yrs ago and has been used in our gardens ever since. It prefers a nice damp soil in a sunny spot in the borders, will take a little bit of shade as well. It is a difficult plant to use in gardens due to its height but as well as it’s attraction to butterflies it is also a tough plant and is disliked by both rabbits and deer, that makes it’s rather useful when they are a pain in the garden.
It has uses out of the garden too and makes a great cutflower both fresh from the garden and also dried. They can be easily dried by cutting a newly opened flower and hanging up for 4-5 weeks in a dry shed.
The name is also a brilliant one, Centaurea comes from Centuar Chiron, he cured a wound from a arrow dipped into Hydra’s blood by covering it with the flowers from the plant. Macrocephala comes from the Greek words, markos meaning large and kephale meaning head, so we have large head.
It does take a few years to get established, but once it gets going, it forms a good clump up to 1ft wide with the plant growing up to 5ft tall. It is pretty easy to grow both from seed and also by dividing in the spring.
It really is a beautiful plant, one that should be grown much more in our gardens.
centaurea macrocephala Plant of the week  Centaurea macrocephala

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Plant of the week- Buddleja davidii ‘Black Knight’ 

img 0204 Plant of the week  Buddleja davidii Black Knight 

img 5180 Plant of the week  Buddleja davidii Black Knight 
Well after a few weeks break with the Rose of the week, we are back to the plant of the week but with a slight difference. For the next month it’s The Butterfly count. This is carried out each year by the Butterfly conservation to monitor the more common types of butterflies we see in our gardens. So to celebrate this, for the next month I will be focusing on plants that are looking great at this time of year but also attract in butterflies. To start this off, it has to be the Butterfly Bush, Buddleja. There are so many great forms of great plant (check back in a few weeks for a more indepth look) but I have chosen my favourite form and also one of the darkest forms of Buddleja, Black Knight. 

img 0201 Plant of the week  Buddleja davidii Black Knight 
Buddleja davidii is a native of Central and west China, were it grows up to 8000ft above seas level, where it can grow in some  pretty poor soils, hence the reason it selfseeds and grows in any space in the uk, whether it’s a bit of waste ground, roof top or sides of a quarry. Sadly this ability has labelled it as a invasive plant. It was introduced into Europe by the French missionary Father David (hence davidii) from east Tibet in 1869. Buddleja itself was named of the British amateur Reverend Adam Buddleja by Von Linne in 1737. The form ‘Black Knight’ was bred by the famous Moerheim nursery in Holland by Ruys. It has become the most popular form of Buddleja to be grown mainly due to is stunning flowers that are the darkest form of any Buddleja. The flowers funny enough are smaller than the normal size of Buddleja flowers by are bourne on plants that will quite happily make 4m in height. It was grow away in most forms of soil, although it will struggle on heavy waterlogged ones. 

img 0200 Plant of the week  Buddleja davidii Black Knight 
It is pretty pest and disease free apart from the horrible eel worm. They are a microscopic nematodes that live in the young shoots of leaves of the plant, they tend to cause yellow patches in the leaves and deformed growth on the tips of new growth. To check if it has it, cut an infected shoot up and place into a glass of water and leaves for 30 minutes, if they are present, you will see tiny little balls of these tiny tiny worms at the bottom of the glass. To treat, best way is to remove infected shoots during the growing season and all old leaves in the winter and burn. 

Pretty easy to prune, I tend to prune mine in March and more details can be found here https://thomasdstone.blog/2017/03/17/job-of-the-week-pruning-buddeja/

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Welcome home Granddad! 

img 0001 Welcome home Granddad! 

img 0001 Welcome home Granddad! 
Well after being lost for many years, I finally have grandad back with me! No he didn’t go wondering around the world and got lost on some great adventure in the middle of the Himalayas or to darkest Peru but he is indeed a plant I named after my grandad. 

I have had a love for Hardy geraniums for many years and back in the late 1990’s, I made massed a small collection of about 200 different types including a lot of my favourite group, the phaeums, oh how I love the mourning widows, with their different shades of colours, sticking out with their different patterns on the flowers , great leaves, some with fantastic patterns that remind me of a child’s sponge printing. Like any small collection, these plants will cross bred amongst themselves and produce the odd new plant and that exciting thing happened to me in 2000, a beautiful red form with cracking black markings on the leaves, I left it in the garden to see what will happen, 2001, I was so excited to see the flower buds appear when I had the bad new that my Grandad had passed away.  Our grand parents have an amazing role in our life’s don’t they, they are lucky enough to spend quality time with us, with the ease of handing us back to our parents if we do anything wrong, spend many happy days out walking with them, across the fields of hampshire as well as Buckinghamshire, times on holidays and hearing their stories of their lives. I can still remember my grandad, sat in his favourite chair, playing with his pipe and talking about football, mainly about the brilliant Watford football club!  and telling me to pass my driving test! Wonderful memories and felt I wanted to honour him with this new seedling so Geranium phaeum ‘George Stone’ was named 

It grew well in my Hampshire home and it was divided up and used in a plant swap in a well know geranium nursery in Norfolk, went on trail at the RHS Geranium trails at Wisley gardens as well. In 2006, for various reasons, I moved to West Sussex for a new job that only sadly  lasted for year and with the constant moving, being homeless etc, I managed to loss all my geraniums, every single one, I was gutted. It took me many years before I was settled again and my love of plants was set on fire again once more and I wanted my grandad back again with me at home. Sadly for some reason the Norfolk nursery failed to answer my emails, tweets and messages as to whether they still had it despite it being listed on plant finder with them. It really really upset me thinking I may never get the plant back again. Thankfully in 2017, a new supplier was listed in the plant finder, Gardener’s Cottage plants, a quick email and then a chat with the lovely Andrew Davenport, talking as all gardeners do, about plants, gardens and all things garden related, he did say he had one plant left! It just made my year! Soon after, the plant arrived home and now it’s settled in nicely back with me and just started to flower once more. This time I am going to build my stocks up, supply to a lot of others to have in their gardens and this time I will not lose my Grandad! 

img 0002 Welcome home Granddad! 

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15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 

The show gardens and brilliant displays in the marques do certainly catch your eyes but they wouldn’t any good if the wrong plants were chosen, so let’s have a little look at some of the plants that caught my eye both around the gardens and in the marques. Some a new to me and caught my eye that way, others old friends that it was great to see them being so used around the different gardens. There were so many great plants, it was difficult to keep it to 15 but never less I managed too. I hope you enjoy my 15 as much as I did and I can’t wait for next years show to see what they are offering. 

img 1660 1 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Allium ‘Forelock’ (left) this was a new one for me, I loved the way some of the tiny flowers form a Mohican hair cut on top of the flowers. It make a large plant up to 5ft tall, with the flowers bending over like a Shepards crook before they open and then straighten up just as they do. Needs a dry sunny spot in the garden ideally.
img 1633 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Sphaeralcea ‘Hopleys Lavender’ (right) not seen this form of this semi hardy member of the mallow family before and I loved the soft pink flowers. The shrub grows up to 90cm tall and 90cm wide and is hardy down to -5c. Does like a nice sunny spot. Looks a great looking shrub
img 1609 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Fagus sylvicatica ‘Rolf Marquardt’ OMG! I have a soft spot for Beeches after building up a small collection in a former job. This beauty took my breathe away and I want it, appently makes a small tree, hoping to find out it’s ok in pots!
img 1647 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Achillea ‘Emily May’ again a new form for me, love the bright red flowers on this member of the daisy family, not seen an achillea as red as this before. It flowers from June-September in a sunny dry spot, does need a little bit of spend bloom removal to keep it flowering
 
img 1676 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Gladiolus hybrid ‘Flevo Cool’ (left) is one of those plants that just take your breath away either because you love the mix of colours or because you hate it. Personally I love it and can’t wait to order some for next summer to add somewhere to my rather cramped borders (always room for one more!) grows to about 60cm in height and work well as a cut flower plant as well in the garden.
img 1631 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Cosmos sulphurus ‘Pamela’s Pick’ (right)cosmos are one of my favourite garden plants for filling little spaces around the garden, normally seen in pinks, whites, reds, purples etc. Not seen a yellow one until the show, beautiful colour mixed with great looking foliage, certainly one I will be trying from seed soon! Gets to about 90cm in height and flowers all summer long
img 1667 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Potentilla x hopwoodiana (left) this great ground cover plant. This herbaceous form of Potentilla again flowers all summer long with this beautiful soft salmon pink flowers. It’s easy to grow and loves to be in some sun at the front of a border and works very well with pale or white roses. Just remove the older stems that have finished flowering to encourage more
img 1662 1 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Crocosmia ‘Paul’s best yellow’ crocosmia’s are a plant that I love and hate at the same time, they are beautiful flowers and such striking foliage until it all started falling over. This one however is such a clear bright yellow that I will let it off! Makes a plant about 90cm in height and needs a nice damp sunny spot to get the very best from it, sadly my own garden is too dry for it.
img 1613 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Saxifraga fortunei ‘Crystal Pink’ wow! What a foliage plant! It’s like an artist has got a green leave and then gone to town with white and pink paints all over the leaves and the effect is purely stunning. It’s certainly another plant I have added to my list! It does like a light shady or fully shady spot in dryish soil and will grow better in a pot. Does flower in September October but no way as nice as the foliage!
img 1560 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Pelegonium ‘Pink Aurore’ (right) I do love pellies and I wish I had somewhere to over winter them, I don’t sadly at the moment and I am missing out on great plants like Pink Aurore, this unique type of pelegonium is ideal for use in containers being a good bushy plant that flowers all summer long with these bright pink flowers over a grey scented foliage. Wonderful display from Fibex nursery!
img 1599 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Digitalis parviforia ‘Milk Chocolate’ (left) these longer lived foxgloves are becoming more popular now and it’s easy to see why, they have a quite unique flower flower that’s bourne from July to October and is so loved by bees! They will also live for up to 5 years if you are lucky and again will take a shady dryish spot. Not being to tall at 60cm, they mix brilliantly with other plantings.
img 1618 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Erigeron glaucus ‘Sea Breeze’ (right) another tough tough plant that will take almost everything you throw at it, including really dry sunny spots, in cracks of rocks even in very exposed seaside spots. This low growing plant has evergree leaves that are pretty atractive after they have their June to August flowering system.
img 1570 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Helenium ‘Moerheim Beauty’ a plant that was used in so many gardens around the show ground and rightly so, it is a beautiful plant that loves full sun and moist bit of soil to get the best from it. Flowers from June to september but does need a little bit of spent bloom removal to get the best from, it may need a little staking in some years but can also respond well to the Chelsea chop. Can suffer a little from Mildew
img 1594 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Mulberry ‘Charlotte Russe’ I love mulberries! I used live in a gatehouse with 6 planted at the end of the drive, spent many happy years eating the sweet fruit. So pleased they is a smaller one ideal for a container and fruits even longer, from May to September. Wonderful! Was plant of the year at Chelsea this year, can’t wait to get one growing at home!
deschampsia cespitosa bronzeschleier 2 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Deschampsia cespitosa ‘Goldschleier’ is one of so many grasses seen around the gardens over the week and rightly so, they indeed add so much to a garden both in their looks and also the movement from them. Deschampsia was one of the more popular grasses spread around so many gardens, its light golden brown stems will last until January/February if you are lucky and loves a nice sunny free draining soil and will grow to about a metre in height
img 16261 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
Just a beautiful display of Lavenders from Downderry Nursery, too many to choose a favourite so here they are!
img 15561 15ish eye catching plants at Hampton Court 
This display of ferns from Fibrex was amazing. Ferns have too long been over looked and it would be wonderful to see some more ferneries appearing!

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Rose of the week- Stanwells perpetual 

stanwell perpetual Rose of the week  Stanwells perpetual 

stanwell perpetual Rose of the week  Stanwells perpetual 
This rose is a slight oddity, it doesn’t fit into the ‘normal’ brackets of our garden roses that we like to add them too, it even doesn’t quite fit into wild shrub rose bracket I like to add the more species based roses into. But that doesn’t make it a bad rose, it just means we humans can’t add it into a ‘bracket’ like we do to understand things. So why is it so difficult to label? Well it’s a cross between rosa pimpinellifolia and an autumn damask rose that happened by accident in a garden in stanwell, Middlesex. It was introduced a few years later by Lee of Hammersmith in 1838. The rose pimpinellifolia is a suckering wild shrub that can be found around Europe including the UK, it tends to flavour a poorish soil and will take over sand dunes quite happily. 

rosa stanwell perpeual Rose of the week  Stanwells perpetual rosa stanwell perpetual Rose of the week  Stanwells perpetual 
It does make a shrub up to 5ft tall if allowed but it does make a pretty lax plant that needs the support of the older branches, the thorns are pretty fine and very numerous on the shrub but that adds to its charm added to the greyish green fine foliage that makes a brilliant drop back for the lovely pale pink quartered flowers that have the most delightful scent, that are indeed are borne all summer long and well into the autumn months followed by some large black hips. It is a beautiful rose, one that is at home in a border and also at home in the more wild parts of the garden and was indeed Gertrude Jekylls favourite rose to plant into this type of area. Normally such heavenly quartered flowers aren’t good for bees but this one is the exception and will attract bees in quite happily. It is also an exceptionally tough rose, it will take all soil conditions apart from heavy clay and will also take a shady spot in the garden. In her book of roses, Gertrude Jekyll, recommends planting them 1ft apart to form a self supporting group, from my experience, I would agree with her and found it does make a better specimen if treated like that, otherwise it makes a pretty arching shrub. Can be trained into a informal hedge as well. Pruning is dead easy, almost as easy as rambling roses! Any long growths reduced by 2/3rds and remove expired wood and that’s it! Pretty disease free as well. A great rose to start with! 

Can be brought from most nurseries and garden centres as well as being seen in most good gardens. 

stanwell perpetual 2 Rose of the week  Stanwells perpetual 

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6 on Saturday 

img 0006 6 on Saturday 

Well felt it was right to join in with another garden blogging friend, The Propagater, www.thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com with his idea of 6 plants of interest each week on a Saturday. Sadly my garden is quite small, indeed even a couple of postage stamps would struggle to fit into my garden, so for me, it might be every couple of weeks, otherwise it would the same ones every week! 

img 0006 6 on Saturday 
My first is the paper like flowers of Catanache caerula, a tough little Herbaceous plant that’s a member of the daisy family. It gets to about 18inches high in my garden and loves a nice sunny spot here in my borders 

img 2833 6 on Saturday 
Next one has to be a rose, this one is a rambler called ‘Blushing Lucy’ and was planted about 3yrs ago to cover my dividing wall with my neighbours. This year, it’s finally got going this year with some great new growth,so it’s looking even better for next year 

img 0067 6 on Saturday 
Gaura RosyJane is one of Rosemary Hardys finds and it is one of my favourite Gauras. They are a plant that’s gained a bit of favour in the last few years and rightly so, need a sunny free draining spot in your garden

img 0065 6 on Saturday 
Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Applause’ only the second year of this beauty in my garden, I have a love of oak leaved hydrangeas and this form I brought from Head Gardeners Plants down in the new forest, really doing well in my free draining chandlers ford garden 

img 0069 6 on Saturday 
Armeria maritima ‘Pride of Düsseldorf’ time for a little alpine and I do like my alpines, this beautiful form of sea thrift loves my alpine pot, built with fossils me and my boy found in Dorset a couple of years ago, like all Armeria needs a free draining soil.

img 0005 6 on Saturday 
Geranium ‘Azure Rush’ well it looks a little like Rozanne but it’s a lot lower growing and pretty well behaved. It doesn’t take over the borders but gives you a summer of flowers. Well worth growing! 

Well that’s my 6 for this week, will be back in 2 weeks time with another 6 I hope! Until then, I hope you enjoy these ones